Redmond Historical Society Saturday Speaker Series - "The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon" - Experience Redmond
Experience Redmond, Washington
Experience Redmond, Washington

Redmond Historical Society Saturday Speaker Series — “The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon”

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Nov 12

10:30 am - 10:30 pm

Redmond Historical Society Saturday Speaker Series — “The Razor’s Edge: The Washington Razor Clam Phenomenon”

Old Redmond Schoolhouse
16600 NE 80th St
Redmond, WA 98052


Note: This is a HYBRID program. Join us online via Zoom, or in person at the Old Redmond Schoolhouse at 16600 NE 80th St., Redmond, WA 98052. If you do join us in person, masking is recommended but not required.

Registration is required for the Zoom component.
To register for this free online presentation: https://tinyurl.com/RHSRazorClam

‘Buried Treasure’: Seattle Author to Speak on Washington’s Razor Clam Phenomenon

Redmond Historical Society closes its Fall Saturday Speaker Series November 12 with a favorite pastime and a lesson in shellfish treaty rights

The community is invited to an exciting conversation—both virtual and in person—with author, historian, and marine biologist David Berger, who wrote a book about Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest. In fact, this historic bivalve has become such an obsession that the author is working with a group to make the razor clam the state clam.

What brings thousands of men, women, and children to Washington’s sandy coastal beaches every year, braving weather and surf? The buried treasure known as the Pacific razor clam.

Hunting and gathering these creatures has preoccupied Northwesterners from the time of the Native peoples to the present moment. Challenging to dig, delicious to eat, and providing a sometimes-heady experience of abundance, razor clams are entwined with the state’s commerce, identity, and history. Join in person or online as the author explores the twists and turns of a quintessential Northwest activity from its pre-settlement days to the present.

David Berger has worked as a visual arts critic for The Seattle Times, executive director of a botanical garden, and as a communication officer for Dunhuang, a World Heritage Site on the Silk Road in China. Berger is also a Metcalf Fellow for Marine and Environmental Reporting. David Berger started razor clamming when he moved to Washington after graduating from college. Answering the many questions generated about razor clam lore, history, and biology led to writing a book, Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest, published in fall 2017. When not razor clamming, Berger is also a visual artist. In addition to Razor Clams, he wrote Persimmon and Frog: My Life and Art (Chin Music Press, 2020), about Fumiko Kimura. He lives in Seattle.

Photo credit to Humanities Washington

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